Love Letter 1900′s

My Dear Nellie:

I can’t wait until I get home before I address you.  I arrived in the “burgh” Wednesday.  When I took the cars to Jonesborough, I accidently met an old female friend from Twiggs County, now a student at Madison.  The name is Miss Kate McNellum.  She was accompanied by a college friend with whom I became acquainted, but I assure you my heart was not impurified, even if my mind was.  I think I will go home tomorrow being somewhat obliged to remain to have my guitar mended.  I found it broken when I got to Jonesborough. 

You remember Mr. Weaver do you not, who once was stationed in McDonough – a preacher?  Yes, well, I saw him also the other day and yesterday.  You are perhaps aware of the fact that the Baptists hold their convention in town today and until Tuesday.  A great many old men who feel with importance the mighty weight they are sustaining in the cause of Christ are visible on the streets promenading consequentially and seemingly pratting sage subjects.  Alas!  Delusional, delusional, why has thou such a strong hold on the public mind and shoot thy poisoned arrows of superstition into the crediting hearts of ignorant fools?  I believe, Nellie, there is indeed much consistency in the faith and profession of some preachers, but alas!  Where vanity has a showing, rejected yet, pure religions lurks wholly in the shadow.  But I will stop this – I left you with a sad, but hopeful heart.  I may, indeed, experience the heart harrowing pang of sorrow for a while, yet the genial light of hope will dawn on my lonliness wherever the bearing of memory steals over the incidents of the past and linger with brightened brightness on our last sweet interview.

Our hearts may be different and you remember me only as a transient, say in your experience, and when the parting horn shows out its retiring light, yet so long as life shall last, in this embodiment of true love and devotion, my heart will even throb more wildly to the recollection of your loved self.  I have been incredulous long enough.  I confess I have felt the pangs from the belief that you have never truly loved me and my God.  The recollection pangs me, but I humbly trust we now know each other.  I am confident dear Nellie, that you have always known me and I am glad it is so.  I am one who can with difficulty hide my feelings of the heart and sometimes I am very impulsive.  I need to think you would always remain true, because you had said you would.  I know, or at least think very strongly, that you will adhere to whatever you say.  My thoughts are on the future as well as the past.  My heart beats anxiously to the evolution of the index on the dial plate of time.  Are you hopeful of the future dear Nellie?  Please deal with me candidly. 

My love to your mother.  Direct to my old address – Jeffersonville.  Goodbye.

Yours fondly in the pledge of love,

 

George

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